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Scientific Research Journal

Scirj Volume IV, Issue IV, April 2016 Edition
ISSN: 2201-2796


Publication starts: 25th April 2016
Full Paper available from: 25th April 2016


Dark data: Business Analytical tools and Facilities for illuminating dark data
Njeru Mwiti Kevin, Felister Munyi Wanyaga, David Kibaara, Wilkister Atieno Dinda, James Kariuki Ngatia

Abstract: The most important asset for any organization today is data. Organizations collect and store vast amounts of data every day relating to their various business activities. Understanding this data leads to better insights, less costs and risks and provides avenues in which the organization can improve its performance, offer better services to its customers and earn more revenue giving it a competitive advantage in the market. Advanced tools have been developed to gain this much needed insight into data that was previously considered irrelevant or inaccessible based on its unstructured form. These tools help an organization drill into its data and data from other external sources such as competitors, government reports, proprietary and other multi dimensional databases available from the internet to gain knowledge that can be applied to improve the organization’s competitive position. The aim of this research is to provide insights to organizations on how business analytic tools and software can be applied in lighting up previously unknown or ignored data. This is done through an in-depth analysis of secondary data and practitioner reports to provide an understanding of the various concepts and tools essential in identifying meaningful patterns and trends into an organization’s data.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 1-10


Beyond Branding: The Logical Consequence of Packaging and Repackaging in Corporate Management Strategy
Alfred JM Edema PhD

Abstract: Packaging is made up of the non-physical, intangible or invisible parts and the physical, tangible or visible parts. Often, scholarly discourses have heavily dwelt on the physical or visible elements of packaging. This may have laid strong belief for majority of learners that packaging is almost only about how to house products. In recent time practitioners have paraded much about branding and re-branding than the supposed function that begets the brand and branding. Cognitively, packaging is the sense that gives direction to the brand. Beyond branding, packaging is, in fact, a continuous cycle, which includes product or brand maintenance even when the product is already on the shelf or in the market, and concerns with the final presentation of the brand to the customer or consumer. Thus, the package is the brand (P = B). This work is empirically conceptual, with arguments based on literature and observations which are open to provoke further thoughts.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 11-16


Modeling Quality of Life of University Students using Structural Equation Model
Azme Khamis & Nursu’aidah Binti Abd. Wahab

Abstract: This study is attempted to investigate factors influencing on Quality of life (QoL) of university student toward the satisfaction on academic aspect (AA), social aspect (SA) and facilities (FC) by using Structural Equation Model (SEM). The data used in this study is primary data. The data is obtained from self- administrative questionnaires that distributed randomly to 248 students within Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM). The data was analyzed using SPSS for preliminary analysis while AMOS 18 was used for Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). This study found that the satisfaction on academic aspect (AA) and facilities (FC) have significantly affected to Quality of life of UTHM students while there is insignificant effect of satisfaction on social aspect (SA) toward Quality of life of UTHM students.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 17-24


The Effects of Integrative Supply Chain Management on the Just in Time and Competitiveness of the Food and Beverage Manufacturing Companies in Makassar
Edy Jumady, Nurdin Brasit, Jusni, Maat Pono

Abstract: This study aims to examine and to analyze the effects of integrative supply chain management (SCM) on competitiveness mediated by the just in time (JIT), taking the Food and Beverages manufacturing companies in Makasar as a case study. This is an explanatory research with the number of respondents of 75 managers of the companies under surveyed. The statistical analysis used to estimate and test the hypotheses is the Generalized Structured Analysis (GeSCA). The study found as follows. First, there is a significant effect of the integrative supply chain management (SCM) on just in time (JIT) and competitiveness of the manufacturing companies under survey. Secondly, the integrative supply chain management has also had a significant effect on industries’ competitiveness mediated by just in time. This study, therefore, suggested that both the integrative supply chain management and just in time should be given attention to increase the competitiveness of the Food and beverages manufacturing companies in Makasar, South Sulawesi.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 25-29


Government Expenditure and Economic Growth in Nigeria: A Co-Integration and Error Correction Modeling
Ojonugwa Usman , Esther Abdul Agbede , Hindatu, A. Bako

Abstract: This study examined the relationship between government expenditure and economic growth in Nigeria using a co-integration and error correction model for the period 1970-2010. A time-series data was obtained from the Central Bank of Nigeria for the analysis. The outcome of the ADF unit root test indicated that all variables included in the model were non-stationary at their levels but integrated of order one, I(1). From the long-run analysis, the results revealed a positive and significant linear relationship between the two categories of government expenditure and economic growth (measured by real GDP), whereas on the short-run, economic growth had a positive and significant linear relationship with recurrent expenditure and negative but significant relationship with capital expenditure. The result of the Pairwise Granger Causality test in a Vector Error Correction Model indicated a unidirectional (one-way) causality, running from economic growth to capital expenditure and recurrent expenditure to economic growth, while bi-directional causality runs from capital expenditure to recurrent expenditure and vice versa. Therefore, the study recommended the need to stimulate economic growth by allocating appropriate proportion to capital expenditure of government in the national budget.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 30-37


The Implementation of Non-Career Justice Recruitment for the Supreme Court in Indonesia
Dr. A. Muhammad Asrun

Abstract: It is undeniable that the presence of the non-career justices has been filled with intellectual treasures in the decisions of the Supreme Court. Their capabilities of legal knowledge have strengthened Supreme Court verdicts in the past. That's one side of the presence of the non-career justices. However, the situation today has changed over the presence of the non-career justices. The candidate of non-career justices from universities have been questioned their working capability as well as their understanding on procedural law. Justices recruited from universities admitted that they need time to learn to read files quickly and their practice in making a decision. The exercise takes about three to six months. The problem really should not be happening when the non-career justices had legal practice experiences such as a lawyer or as a legal consultant at a law firm.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 38-43


Intra- Regional Trade in Staple Foods in Eastern and Southern Africa:Does Trade Protection Still Exist?
Mary Mbithi, Joseph Karugia, Paul Guthiga and Kennedy Osoro

Abstract: This study accesses tariff protection measures for selected staples food products among COMESA member countries and their key regional trading partners from Eastern and Southern Africa. The staple foods products analyzed include: maize grain, rice grain, dry legumes, live bovine animals, milk and cream, bovine meat, fish and crustaceans, tomatoes, maize flour, wheat flour, cassava and onions. Average tariffs are ranked while existence of tariff peaks, tariff escalation and other non-transparent tariffs, particularly specific tariffs are analysed. The study finds that staple food products import protection exists in terms of high tariffs (tariff peaks), tariff escalation and specific duties (in some years). EAC Partner State countries of Tanzania, Burundi, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Kenya have the highest protection for their staple food markets. Staple food product exports from Congo D.R., Djibouti, Sudan and South Africa face most severe restrictions in terms of import tariff barriers in intra-regional trade. On average maize, rice and milk products are the most protected staple foods with high tariffs. Tariff escalation exists for meat, wheat, maize, rice and related products. For an improved food security through increased food products’ trade, it is recommended that countries in the region facilitate and increase intra-regional staple foods trade by eliminating existing tariffs on imports of staple food products from the region; eliminating high tariffs and tariff escalation; and encouraging value addition of staple foods traded in the region.
Read Full Paper Reference this paper Page 44-52



Published Issue:

Scirj, Volume V
October Issue [In Process]
September Issue
August Issue
July Issue
June Issue
May Issue
April Issue
March Issue
February Issue
January Issue

Scirj, Volume IV
December Issue
November Issue
October Issue
September Issue
August Issue
July Issue
June Issue
May Issue
April Issue
March Issue
February Issue
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