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Scirj, Volume IX [2021]
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Scirj Volume IX, Issue VI, June 2021 Edition
ISSN: 2201-2796

Socio-economic determinants of production and consumption of African Indigenous Vegetables in Kakuma refugee camp and Kakuma town, Kenya

Stephen Kahara, Losenge Turoop and Eucabeth Majiwa

Abstract: African Indigenous Vegetables remain important in the food system due to their relative importance in providing nutritious food for the rural and urban population. AIVs contain high micronutrients such as carotene, iron, calcium, magnesium and vitamins important for proper body functioning hence contributing to food security and nutrition especially in resource-poor households. AIVs have low input requirements and can adapt to many agro-ecological zones. Despite their importance, the production and consumption of AIVs are progressively declining in Kenya. Further, AIVs remain less exploited, especially in the arid and semi-arid areas. It is on this backdrop that this study assessed the socio-economic determinants of production and utilization of AIVs in the Kakuma refugee camp and its environs. Using a descriptive survey design, the study collected data from 172 farmers from Kakuma Refugee Camp and Kakuma Town. Both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were used to obtain frequencies, mean, chi-square test and a linear regression model to assess socio-economic determinants of production and consumption of AIVs. The results indicated that the main AIVs produced and consumed in Kakuma town and refugee camp were Amaranths, Cowpea and Jute mallow. The country of origin, marital status and age of the household head significantly influenced the production of AIVs. Further, land ownership, communal farming and awareness creation by self-help groups and preferences of AIVs to exotic vegetables had a significant relationship with the production and consumption of AIVs. Income generation was a motivating factor for producing AIVs. Since age and the country of origin influenced the production and consumption of AIVs, the study recommends that there is a need for people to adopt a culture of producing and consuming more AIVs to promote production of AIVs.

Reference this Paper: Socio-economic determinants of production and consumption of African Indigenous Vegetables in Kakuma refugee camp and Kakuma town, Kenya by Stephen Kahara, Losenge Turoop and Eucabeth Majiwa published at: "Scientific Research Journal (Scirj), Volume IX, Issue VI, June 2021 Edition, Page 11-33 ".

Search Terms: African Indigenous Vegetables (AIVs), production, consumption, Kakuma

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